Each week we webcast Lord's Day Sabbath School at 10a, morning public worship at 11a, and p.m. singing and sermon at 2:30p (sermon at 3:30)

Tuesday, August 11, 2020

2020.08.11 Hopewell @Home ▫ 2 Timothy 1:7–10

 Read 2 Timothy 1:7–10

Questions from the Scripture text: What has God not given us (2 Timothy 1:7)? Of what three things has He given us a Spirit? What, then, must we not do with the testimony of our Lord (2 Timothy 1:8)? Of what (whom) else should Timothy not be ashamed? What should he share? With whom? For what? According to what? What two things has God done for us (2 Timothy 1:9)? With what kind of calling has He called us? What was His saving and calling us not according to? What two things were they according to? In Whom was this grace given to us? When was it given? When was it revealed (2 Timothy 1:10)? By what? What has Jesus abolished? What two things has Jesus brought to light? Through what?

Next week’s Call to Worship, Prayer for Help, and Confession of Sin come from 2 Timothy 1:7–10 in order that we will see that we are singing God’s thoughts after Him with Eternal Spirit, God of Truth.

One of the most common commands in Scripture is to fear not. But, we are unable to obey this command in ourselves, for we have received a spirit of fear from our first father, Adam. “I heard Your voice in the garden, and I was afraid” (Genesis 3:10). As sinners, we have lost holy fear and live instead in a constant trembling at what might happen—and especially of what men might think of us or do to us.

But if Timothy was going to stir up the gift of God that was given him in the calling of his ordination (2 Timothy 1:6), he could hardly afford to worry about what others might think. And, if we are going to be faithful in each of our callings, we must avoid the trap of the fear of man. So, how can we be delivered from a spirit of fear?

God has given us a new nature, and the ministry of His Holy Spirit, Who grows our new selves in power, love, and sound mind. Power gives us the courage to stand before others. Love is more “power”-full. Out of love to God, we are willing and even honored to suffer or die for Him. And a sound mind calculates everything from an eternal perspective—unwilling to trade lasting and genuine treasure for the fleeting and light fleshly pleasures or praises of men.

To this, the apostle adds a reminder of the gospel in 2 Timothy 1:8-10. The sufferings of the Christian life are not just “better than we deserve”—as if we deserve extremely badly and are receiving a lot that is fair-to-middling. No, we deserved Hell, and God has given us life and immortality—together with the privilege of glorifying Christ by suffering well with Him, which privilege we will count a high and great honor for unending ages!

Courage. Love to God. Bringing biblical, eternal wisdom to bear on our actions. That is how recipients of such a glorious grace should live!

What trials are you in? How does power help you in them? How does love help you? How does “sound mind”?

Suggested songs: ARP1 “How Blessed the Man” or TPH394 “Eternal Spirit, God of Truth”


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